Think UAV safety first

Civilian UAV safety rules in Canada [AVdb c_code=CA  c_title=Canada] The Government of Canada’s UAV safety awareness campaign for unmanned air vehicles (UAVs), or drones began 21 October 2014. The national campaign will help ensure UAV users—both recreational and commercial—understand the rules of the skies and always think safety first. During phase I infographics and guidelines […]

Civilian UAV safety rules in Canada

Drones, UAV, UAS, RPAS, unmanned air vehicles or systems, remotely piloted aircraft systems and model aircraft come with substantial pilot responsibilities.

[AVdb c_code=CA  c_title=Canada]

The Government of Canada’s UAV safety awareness campaign for unmanned air vehicles (UAVs), or drones began 21 October 2014. The national campaign will help ensure UAV users—both recreational and commercial—understand the rules of the skies and always think safety first. During phase I infographics and guidelines will be released to increase awareness. Phase II will include a social media campaign including videos and a simpler process for permission to fly a UAV.

Transport Canada is making it easier to fly small UAVs for work and pleasure. Under the new exemptions, a Special Flight Operations Certificate (SFOC) will not be required for UAVs under 2 kilograms and certain operations involving UAVs under 25 kilograms. The new approach will apply to commercial operations and contribute to a strong safety regime for those on the ground and in the skies.

“Transport Canada has requirements in place for aircraft of all sizes. For businesses, these changes will make it easier for their small UAVs to take flight sooner, while maintaining the safety of those on the ground and in the skies.”

The Honourable Lisa Raitt
Minister of Transport

Visit this link to learn all about UAV and how they are regulated in Canada.

Transport Canada has indicated that the new streamlined rules coming in November will place more self responsibility on the pilots of UAVs 2 kg and below. “In addition to respecting the Canadian Aviation Regulations, UAV operators must follow the rules in all acts and regulations, including the Criminal Code as well as all municipal, provincial, and territorial laws regarding trespassing and privacy.” However these lighter aircraft will be permitted to conduct commercial assignments without an SFOC on file.

“Coupled with the safety awareness campaign announced two weeks ago, I believe that Canada now has one of the most effective and progressive UAV regulatory frameworks in the world.”

Stewart Baillie
Chairman, Unmanned Systems Canada

Air-Vid has prepared a detailed UAV Safety Checklist. This comprehensive guide offers procedures and tips that will help all UAV flight crews work responsibly and safely during every mission.

“It’s great to see countries opening up the skies for both hobby and commercial use of sUAS in this weight class. It does, however, also mean that education about responsible use is even more important.Manufacturers, dealers, and regulatory bodies will have to work together to make sure that every prospective sUAS owner knows that he/she can and can’t do.”

Eric Cheng
Director of Aerial Imaging, DJI

Transport Canada Guidelines

Do

  • Only fly your aircraft during daylight and in good weather (not in clouds or fog).
  • Always be able to see your aircraft with your own eyes – not only through an on-board camera, monitor or smartphone.
  • Make sure your aircraft is safe for flight before take-off. Ask yourself, for example, are the batteries fully charged? Is it too cold to fly?
  • Know when to apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate
  • Respect the privacy of others – for example, avoid flying your aircraft over private property or using it to take photos or videos without permission.

Don’t fly:

  • Any closer than 5 miles (8 km) from any airport, heliport or aerodrome.
  • Higher than 300 feet (90 metres) above the ground.
  • Within restricted airspace (such as military bases, prisons, forest fire areas).
  • Closer than 100 feet (30 metres) from vehicles, boats, buildings, structures or people.
  • In populated areas or near large groups of people (such as at sporting events, concerts, festivals, firework shows).
  • Where or when you could interfere with any first responders (fire department, police, etc) as they conduct their duties.
  • Near moving vehicles. Avoid highways, bridges, busy streets or anywhere you could endanger or distract drivers.

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  1. Pingback:New rules for small uav's / drones.

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