Global UAV best practices survey

A brief survey of the global UAV best practices for civilian sUAS flights reveals these key thoughts. Air-Vid.com suggests that if you are flying UAVs in a commercial context that you consider the following concepts and create and publish your own company’s policies around each point. With so much opportunity at stake and so many […]
Air-Vid’s UAV directory has more that 700 pilots from 60+ countries. Globally the rules for commercial UAV flights are a boiling pot of rules, regulations and expectations.

A brief survey of the global UAV best practices for civilian sUAS flights reveals these key thoughts. Air-Vid.com suggests that if you are flying UAVs in a commercial context that you consider the following concepts and create and publish your own company’s policies around each point. With so much opportunity at stake and so many confusing rules and public fears why not set the precedent and example by promoting a safe and responsible profile for your UAV practice? Click this link to view Air-Vid’s “Safety First Checklist”. Also review before your UAV takes off!

We welcome feedback and corrections with supporting links to the appropriate sources in order to fully document and improve our understanding of the Rules and Regulations that apply to Drone / UAV commercial use.

Global Survey of Civilian UAV practices

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Canada

Aircraft Mass Airworthiness Approval? Registration? Operating Permission? Pilot Qualification
20 kg and less No. However UAV that fails could be subject a hefty fine as high as $25 000. No SFOC only
for >2kg UAVs
Liability insurance only for <2kg UAVs

UAV operations for civil or commercial purposes require a Special Flight Operations Certificate (SFOC) issued by Transport Canada. SFOCs provide authorization for flight under special cases specific to a geographical area for a specific mission. The information that must be contained in an application for an SFOC includes details such as: type and purpose of the operation; description of the aircraft; dates and times of the proposed flight; security plans and emergency contingency plans; and a detailed plan describing how the operation will be carried out including: altitude and routes where the operation will be carried out, the location of any obstacles, and the exact boundaries of the area for the operation. There are exemptions to the SFOC application process, however, there is still a long list of requirements to fulfill in order to be compliant.

[AVdb c_code=CA  c_title=Canada]

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United Kingdom

Aircraft Mass Airworthiness Approval? Registration? Operating Permission? Pilot Qualification
20 kg and less No No Required BNUC-S or equivalent.

UAV operations for civil or commercial purposes is regulated by CAA .

Anyone who is using a drone under 20kg for commercial purposes has to be licensed to ensure that they are sufficiently trained to fly the plane and have the appropriate insurance in place.

[AVdb c_code=GB  c_title=’Great Britan’]

[AVdb c_code=IE  c_title=’Ireland’]

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USA

Aircraft Mass Airworthiness Approval? Registration? Operating Permission? Pilot Qualification
No UAVs permitted No No No No

UAV operations for civil or commercial purposes is forbidden by the FAA. The agency already allows law enforcement agencies, fire departments and other public agencies to use drones but has, in effect, banned their use for commercial purposes since 2005. Current FAA UAV policy is specified in AFS-400 UAS Policy 05-01, published on September 16, 2005. The FAA has put off issuing regulations on commercial use out of concern that doing so could create safety hazards for conventional commercial aircraft. Each state has it’s own UAV regulations.

The rules are changing under FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012. In September 2014 the first exemptions were created for six hollywood production companies. If you would like to apply for an exemption of your own, this is the page to visit. The FAA plans to propose new rules on how small drones could be used legally for commercial purposes. It could take several more years for the rules to become final.

[AVdb c_code=US  c_title=”the United States of America”]

LOGO CE_Vertical_EN_quadri

Europe

Aircraft Mass Airworthiness Approval? Registration? Operating Permission? Pilot Qualification
25kg and less  Vehicle description submitted Required Required Yes + Insurance certificate

UAV operations for civil or commercial purposes is regulated by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). At this moment the institution is in flux while the European RPAS Steering Group (ERSG) is working to set standards across the European Union. A review of the legal guidelines is available here. A new European Commission initiative will explore the civil use of UAVS in more detail as the industry continues to grow

Currently, light RPA (< 150 kg) operations in VLOS (Visual Line of Sight) and E-VLOS are taking place in a number of European countries, but based on non-mutually recognized or harmonized national rules. Such operations can be conducted in all air space classes, but always in visual contact of the remote pilot or an observer. Routine operations are normally allowed outside congested areas, to reduce the risk for people on the ground, while alleviating the airworthiness certification processes for RPAS of small mass (e.g. below 25 Kg). Additional safety requirements and processes apply, when an RPAS operator wishes to fly over densely populated areas. Operations at airports are segregated from other traffic. On a case-by-case basis, IFR operations and demonstrations are carried out under strict conditions and mostly in segregated airspace. Civil commercial operations are already allowed in some member States under the responsibility of an approved RPAS operator. An initial set of common rules on the principles to access non-segregated airspace has been proposed by EASA through NPA 2012-10.

[AVdb c_code=FR  c_title=’France’]

[AVdb c_code=ES  c_title=’Spain’]

[AVdb c_code=DE  c_title=’Germany’]

[AVdb c_code=AT  c_title=’Austria’]

[AVdb c_code=NL  c_title=’Netherlands’]

[AVdb c_code=IT  c_title=’Italy’]

[AVdb c_code=GR  c_title=’Greece’]

[AVdb c_code=FI  c_title=’Finland’]

[AVdb c_code=SE  c_title=’Sweden’]

[AVdb c_code=PO c_title=’Poland’]

[AVdb c_code=CZ c_title=’Czech Republic’]

[AVdb c_code=CH c_title=’Switzerland’]

[AVdb c_code=RU c_title=’Russia’]

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Australia

Aircraft Mass Airworthiness Approval? Registration? Operating Permission? Pilot Qualification
25kg and less  Vehicle description submitted Required Required UAV Operators Certificate (UOC)
UAV Controller Certificate (UCC)

UAV operations for civil or commercial purposes is regulated by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA). If you fly an unmanned aircraft, you are part of Australian’s aviation industry and have a number of responsibilities and regulatory requirements. How to become a safe RPA operator. Model Airplanes vs RPA explained here

[AVdb c_code=AU  c_title=Australia]

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New Zealand

Aircraft Mass Airworthiness Approval? Registration? Operating Permission? Pilot Qualification
25kg and less  Operator responsibility No Petition for an Exemption CAA offers an appraisal for operators

UAV operations for civil or commercial purposes is regulated by the New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) is currently in the process of developing policy for the regulation of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems. The current rules split into RPAS at 25kg. UAV or as they prefer RPAS greater than 25 kg are subject to very strict regulations.

[AVdb c_code=NZ  c_title=’New Zealand’]

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Mexico

UAV operations for civil or commercial purposes are largely unregulated and are causally encouraged.

[AVdb c_code=MX  c_title=Mexico]

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Brazil

UAV operations for civil or commercial purposes are unregulated and the country is a leader in UAV adoption.

[AVdb c_code=BR  c_title=Brazil]

bg_region_asia

Asia

UAV operations for civil or commercial purposes are generally not permitted.

[AVdb c_code=JP  c_title=Japan]

[AVdb c_code=CN  c_title=China]

[AVdb c_code=IN  c_title=India]

[AVdb c_code=ID  c_title=Indonesia]

Africa-icon

 

Africa

UAV operations for civil vary from country to Country. Across Africa, very few countries have comprehensive domestic legislation on UAS, privacy, data protection and information storage.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) has no regulations to govern what it calls Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS’s). More info.

[AVdb c_code=ZA  c_title=’South Africa’]

[AVdb c_code=NG  c_title=’Nigeria’]


Additional Reading

http://www.missouridronejournalism.com/2013/04/what-flies-when-it-comes-to-drone-laws-across-the-globe/

 

2 comments

  1. Pingback:New rules for small uav's / drones.

  2. Pingback:Safety enacted! New UAV rules for small unmanned aircraft. - mvp2-Air-Vid.com

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